Finding files in Pharo

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Finding files in Pharo

hernanmd
I would like to find files in Pharo like the UNIX find command:

find . -iname "*.txt" -type f -print

find . \( -iname "*.txt" -o -iname "*.csv" \) -print

find . -maxdepth 2 -name "example*"  -type f -print

find . -type f -atime -7 -size +2M -perm 644 -print

Do we have some package on top of FileSystem to make complex find searches?

Hernán

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Re: Finding files in Pharo

Sven Van Caekenberghe-2
Hernán,

We obviously don't have as many options as find, but this should get you started:

Check the category 'enumerating' in AbstractFileReference, with methods like #childrenMatching: and #allChildrenMatching:

Once you have a reference, you can use other meta data, see the 'accessing' protocol to further your query.

HTH,

Sven

> On 18 Jun 2017, at 04:59, Hernán Morales Durand <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> I would like to find files in Pharo like the UNIX find command:
>
> find . -iname "*.txt" -type f -print
>
> find . \( -iname "*.txt" -o -iname "*.csv" \) -print
>
> find . -maxdepth 2 -name "example*"  -type f -print
>
> find . -type f -atime -7 -size +2M -perm 644 -print
>
> Do we have some package on top of FileSystem to make complex find searches?
>
> Hernán
>


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Re: Finding files in Pharo

John Pfersich
In reply to this post by hernanmd
Why not just use OsProcess or OsSubprocess to run the unix commands (works on Mac OS and Linux)?

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 17, 2017, at 19:59, Hernán Morales Durand <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> I would like to find files in Pharo like the UNIX find command:
>
> find . -iname "*.txt" -type f -print
>
> find . \( -iname "*.txt" -o -iname "*.csv" \) -print
>
> find . -maxdepth 2 -name "example*"  -type f -print
>
> find . -type f -atime -7 -size +2M -perm 644 -print
>
> Do we have some package on top of FileSystem to make complex find searches?
>
> Hernán
>

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Re: Finding files in Pharo

hernanmd

I know file system commands could be executed using the OS wrappers.

But Smalltalk is more elegant than shell command line, and we have Windows still the most used OS.


2017-06-18 3:59 GMT-03:00 john pfersich <[hidden email]>:
Why not just use OsProcess or OsSubprocess to run the unix commands (works on Mac OS and Linux)?

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 17, 2017, at 19:59, Hernán Morales Durand <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> I would like to find files in Pharo like the UNIX find command:
>
> find . -iname "*.txt" -type f -print
>
> find . \( -iname "*.txt" -o -iname "*.csv" \) -print
>
> find . -maxdepth 2 -name "example*"  -type f -print
>
> find . -type f -atime -7 -size +2M -perm 644 -print
>
> Do we have some package on top of FileSystem to make complex find searches?
>
> Hernán
>


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Re: Finding files in Pharo

hernanmd
In reply to this post by Sven Van Caekenberghe-2
Thanks Sven,

Just checking some brave soul out there with a cool "unpublished" package...

Cheers,

Hernán

2017-06-18 3:58 GMT-03:00 Sven Van Caekenberghe <[hidden email]>:
Hernán,

We obviously don't have as many options as find, but this should get you started:

Check the category 'enumerating' in AbstractFileReference, with methods like #childrenMatching: and #allChildrenMatching:

Once you have a reference, you can use other meta data, see the 'accessing' protocol to further your query.

HTH,

Sven

> On 18 Jun 2017, at 04:59, Hernán Morales Durand <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> I would like to find files in Pharo like the UNIX find command:
>
> find . -iname "*.txt" -type f -print
>
> find . \( -iname "*.txt" -o -iname "*.csv" \) -print
>
> find . -maxdepth 2 -name "example*"  -type f -print
>
> find . -type f -atime -7 -size +2M -perm 644 -print
>
> Do we have some package on top of FileSystem to make complex find searches?
>
> Hernán
>



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Re: Finding files in Pharo

Stephane Ducasse-3
In reply to this post by hernanmd
I would love that too :).
Can you tell us what is missing from the file properties?



On Sun, Jun 18, 2017 at 4:59 AM, Hernán Morales Durand
<[hidden email]> wrote:

> I would like to find files in Pharo like the UNIX find command:
>
> find . -iname "*.txt" -type f -print
>
> find . \( -iname "*.txt" -o -iname "*.csv" \) -print
>
> find . -maxdepth 2 -name "example*"  -type f -print
>
> find . -type f -atime -7 -size +2M -perm 644 -print
>
> Do we have some package on top of FileSystem to make complex find searches?
>
> Hernán
>

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Re: Finding files in Pharo

Alistair Grant
In reply to this post by hernanmd
Hi Hernan,

On Sat, Jun 17, 2017 at 11:59:59PM -0300, Hern??n Morales Durand wrote:

> I would like to find files in Pharo like the UNIX find command:
>
> find . -iname "*.txt" -type f -print
>
> find . \( -iname "*.txt" -o -iname "*.csv" \) -print
>
> find . -maxdepth 2 -name "example*"  -type f -print
>
> find . -type f -atime -7 -size +2M -perm 644 -print
>
> Do we have some package on top of FileSystem to make complex find searches?

You might also like to look at the FileSystemVisitor class and subclasses.

Currently you can't strictly do a "-type f" test.  The closest at the
moment is "isDirectory" and "isDirectory not" (which is what #isFile is
defined as).

I've got some patches lined up which will allow you to test things like
#isRegular (which matches "-type f"), #isSymlink, etc.  But it will be
a while before they become available as it involves a new VM plugin.

Cheers,
Alistair


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Re: Finding files in Pharo

hernanmd
In reply to this post by Stephane Ducasse-3
I took the time to review FileSystemDirectoryEntry.

UNIX has 3 types of timestamps

-The access time is the last time when the content was accessed.
-The modification time is last time when the content was modified.
-The change time is the last time when the metadata was modified.

FileSystemDirectoryEntry>>creationTime
This is wrong because there is no such thing as creation time in UNIX.

I checked in Linux chmod'ing an empty file and #creationTime displays the chmod "change time".
Then added content to the file

echo prueba >> test1.txt

And both "creation" and "modification" instance variables were updated.

I couldn't find #accessTime method to get the last timestamp of last access.


Cheers,

Hernán


2017-06-18 10:43 GMT-03:00 Stephane Ducasse <[hidden email]>:
I would love that too :).
Can you tell us what is missing from the file properties?



On Sun, Jun 18, 2017 at 4:59 AM, Hernán Morales Durand
<[hidden email]> wrote:
> I would like to find files in Pharo like the UNIX find command:
>
> find . -iname "*.txt" -type f -print
>
> find . \( -iname "*.txt" -o -iname "*.csv" \) -print
>
> find . -maxdepth 2 -name "example*"  -type f -print
>
> find . -type f -atime -7 -size +2M -perm 644 -print
>
> Do we have some package on top of FileSystem to make complex find searches?
>
> Hernán
>


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Re: Finding files in Pharo

Alistair Grant
Hi Hernan,

On Mon, Jun 19, 2017 at 09:23:35PM -0300, Hern??n Morales Durand wrote:

> I took the time to review FileSystemDirectoryEntry.
>
> UNIX has 3 types of timestamps
>
> -The access time is the last time when the content was accessed.
> -The modification time is last time when the content was modified.
> -The change time is the last time when the metadata was modified.
>
> FileSystemDirectoryEntry>>creationTime
> This is wrong because there is no such thing as creation time in UNIX.

Several linux file systems do support creation time, called birth time,
but my understanding is that there is no standard way to retrieve the
birth time commonly available and cross platform.


> I checked in Linux chmod'ing an empty file and #creationTime displays the chmod
> "change time".
> Then added content to the file
>
> echo prueba >> test1.txt
>
> And both "creation" and "modification" instance variables were updated.
>
> I couldn't find #accessTime method to get the last timestamp of last access.

Linux kernel 4.11 introduced statx(), which adds creation time, but I
don't know if it will be adopted by BSD or MacOS.

The patches I mentioned earlier and plan for Pharo 7 add support for all
4 timestamps (creation, change, modification, access).  Which fields get
populated depends on the platform.  There's a #hasCreationTime flag
which allows you to distinguish between the real creation time and the
change time.

Cheers,
Alistair

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Re: Finding files in Pharo

hernanmd


2017-06-20 3:14 GMT-03:00 Alistair Grant <[hidden email]>:
Hi Hernan,

On Mon, Jun 19, 2017 at 09:23:35PM -0300, Hern??n Morales Durand wrote:
> I took the time to review FileSystemDirectoryEntry.
>
> UNIX has 3 types of timestamps
>
> -The access time is the last time when the content was accessed.
> -The modification time is last time when the content was modified.
> -The change time is the last time when the metadata was modified.
>
> FileSystemDirectoryEntry>>creationTime
> This is wrong because there is no such thing as creation time in UNIX.

Several linux file systems do support creation time, called birth time,
but my understanding is that there is no standard way to retrieve the
birth time commonly available and cross platform.


Thanks for the update, I checked and creation time seems not required by POSIX.
 
> I checked in Linux chmod'ing an empty file and #creationTime displays the chmod
> "change time".
> Then added content to the file
>
> echo prueba >> test1.txt
>
> And both "creation" and "modification" instance variables were updated.
>
> I couldn't find #accessTime method to get the last timestamp of last access.

Linux kernel 4.11 introduced statx(), which adds creation time, but I
don't know if it will be adopted by BSD or MacOS.

The patches I mentioned earlier and plan for Pharo 7 add support for all
4 timestamps (creation, change, modification, access).  Which fields get
populated depends on the platform.  There's a #hasCreationTime flag
which allows you to distinguish between the real creation time and the
change time.


Maybe #creationTime should answer nil or raise an exception if not supported by underlying file system.

It would be nice to has full support for tags.

Cheers,

Hernán
 
Cheers,
Alistair


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Re: Finding files in Pharo

Alistair Grant
On Tue, Jun 20, 2017 at 04:22:31AM -0300, Hern??n Morales Durand wrote:

>
>
> 2017-06-20 3:14 GMT-03:00 Alistair Grant <[hidden email]>:
>
>     Hi Hernan,
>    
>     On Mon, Jun 19, 2017 at 09:23:35PM -0300, Hern??n Morales Durand wrote:
>     > I took the time to review FileSystemDirectoryEntry.
>     >
>     > UNIX has 3 types of timestamps
>     >
>     > -The access time is the last time when the content was accessed.
>     > -The modification time is last time when the content was modified.
>     > -The change time is the last time when the metadata was modified.
>     >
>     > FileSystemDirectoryEntry>>creationTime
>     > This is wrong because there is no such thing as creation time in UNIX.
>
>     Several linux file systems do support creation time, called birth time,
>     but my understanding is that there is no standard way to retrieve the
>     birth time commonly available and cross platform.
>    
>
>
> Thanks for the update, I checked and creation time seems not required by POSIX.
>  
>
>     > I checked in Linux chmod'ing an empty file and #creationTime displays the
>     chmod
>     > "change time".
>     > Then added content to the file
>     >
>     > echo prueba >> test1.txt
>     >
>     > And both "creation" and "modification" instance variables were updated.
>     >
>     > I couldn't find #accessTime method to get the last timestamp of last
>     access.
>
>     Linux kernel 4.11 introduced statx(), which adds creation time, but I
>     don't know if it will be adopted by BSD or MacOS.
>
>     The patches I mentioned earlier and plan for Pharo 7 add support for all
>     4 timestamps (creation, change, modification, access).  Which fields get
>     populated depends on the platform.  There's a #hasCreationTime flag
>     which allows you to distinguish between the real creation time and the
>     change time.
>
>
>
> Maybe #creationTime should answer nil or raise an exception if not supported by
> underlying file system.
>
> It would be nice to has full support for tags.

If this were new behaviour I would raise an exception, but currently
my version of #creationTime continues to return the change time for
backward compatibility (it also seems to be common behaviour on Posix
systems).  The #hasCreationTime flag is there for applications that want
to be specific in their behaviour.

I'm open to changing this if there is sufficient support or a good
enough argument.

Cheers,
Alistair