Pharo 6 snap package

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Pharo 6 snap package

Alistair Grant
Hi Everyone,

I've updated the Pharo 6 snap package for Ubuntu.

The major advantages of using the snap package are:

- No need to install all the 32 bit dependencies on a 64 bit system,
  they're all contained and isolated within the snap package.
- Automagically distinguish between 32 bit and 64 bit images and run the
  appropriate VM (as with the ZeroConf package, the 64 bit VM still
  needs more testing).



To get Pharo up and running on Ubuntu 16.04 or later:

# Install Pharo
$ sudo snap install --candidate pharo --classic
# If your system isn't configured for threaded heartbeat:
$ sudo pharo.config
# Download the latest Pharo 6 image
$ pharo.getimage
# Go...
$ pharo.ui Pharo.image
# or:
$ pharo Pharo.image eval 4+3

To get a list of available commands:

$ snap info pharo


If you're on Debian or Ubuntu 14.04 you'll need to install snapd, see
https://snapcraft.io/docs/core/install


The VM is the threaded heartbeat, dated 201705310241.

The installation flags are:

--candidate - The edge and beta channels are for development versions.  
  It progresses to candidate and then stable.
--classic - Snap packages are normally sandboxed for security
  reasons.  Since Pharo is a development environment
  in which we want to be able to run any executable,
  or load any library, it is installed with access to
  the entire system (as the running user).

Why use snap packages?

- They include all dependencies.  In particular, for the 32 bit
  versions, this means that it isn't necessary to install all the 32 bit
  architecture and associated dependencies.
- Including dependencies means that there shouldn't be any problems with
  incompatible library versions when upgrading.

Why not use snap packages?

- It's a relatively new technology, with a number of rough edges.
- There may still be issues with its sandboxing that I haven't
  discovered yet.
- Because the package uses classic confinement, it isn't
  cross-distribution in practice (unfortunately).

Please let me know of any other advantages or disadvantages you think
should be listed here.

If you don't trust me to configure your system correctly (which requires
sudo):

- All the scripts that make up the sub-commands are visible, e.g.
pharo.config can be viewed at /snap/pharo/current/usr/bin/CONFIG


The packaging code is at: https://github.com/akgrant43/pharo-snap


Cheers,
Alistair

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Re: Pharo 6 snap package

Stephane Ducasse-3
THANKS A LOT ALISTAIR.
I mean it :)

On Tue, Jun 13, 2017 at 10:58 AM, Alistair Grant <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hi Everyone,
>
> I've updated the Pharo 6 snap package for Ubuntu.
>
> The major advantages of using the snap package are:
>
> - No need to install all the 32 bit dependencies on a 64 bit system,
>   they're all contained and isolated within the snap package.
> - Automagically distinguish between 32 bit and 64 bit images and run the
>   appropriate VM (as with the ZeroConf package, the 64 bit VM still
>   needs more testing).
>
>
>
> To get Pharo up and running on Ubuntu 16.04 or later:
>
> # Install Pharo
> $ sudo snap install --candidate pharo --classic
> # If your system isn't configured for threaded heartbeat:
> $ sudo pharo.config
> # Download the latest Pharo 6 image
> $ pharo.getimage
> # Go...
> $ pharo.ui Pharo.image
> # or:
> $ pharo Pharo.image eval 4+3
>
> To get a list of available commands:
>
> $ snap info pharo
>
>
> If you're on Debian or Ubuntu 14.04 you'll need to install snapd, see
> https://snapcraft.io/docs/core/install
>
>
> The VM is the threaded heartbeat, dated 201705310241.
>
> The installation flags are:
>
> --candidate - The edge and beta channels are for development versions.
>   It progresses to candidate and then stable.
> --classic - Snap packages are normally sandboxed for security
>   reasons.  Since Pharo is a development environment
>   in which we want to be able to run any executable,
>   or load any library, it is installed with access to
>   the entire system (as the running user).
>
> Why use snap packages?
>
> - They include all dependencies.  In particular, for the 32 bit
>   versions, this means that it isn't necessary to install all the 32 bit
>   architecture and associated dependencies.
> - Including dependencies means that there shouldn't be any problems with
>   incompatible library versions when upgrading.
>
> Why not use snap packages?
>
> - It's a relatively new technology, with a number of rough edges.
> - There may still be issues with its sandboxing that I haven't
>   discovered yet.
> - Because the package uses classic confinement, it isn't
>   cross-distribution in practice (unfortunately).
>
> Please let me know of any other advantages or disadvantages you think
> should be listed here.
>
> If you don't trust me to configure your system correctly (which requires
> sudo):
>
> - All the scripts that make up the sub-commands are visible, e.g.
> pharo.config can be viewed at /snap/pharo/current/usr/bin/CONFIG
>
>
> The packaging code is at: https://github.com/akgrant43/pharo-snap
>
>
> Cheers,
> Alistair
>

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Re: Pharo 6 snap package

philippeback
I need to upgrade to 16.04 now :-)

Phil

On Tue, Jun 13, 2017 at 11:04 AM, Stephane Ducasse <[hidden email]> wrote:
THANKS A LOT ALISTAIR.
I mean it :)

On Tue, Jun 13, 2017 at 10:58 AM, Alistair Grant <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Hi Everyone,
>
> I've updated the Pharo 6 snap package for Ubuntu.
>
> The major advantages of using the snap package are:
>
> - No need to install all the 32 bit dependencies on a 64 bit system,
>   they're all contained and isolated within the snap package.
> - Automagically distinguish between 32 bit and 64 bit images and run the
>   appropriate VM (as with the ZeroConf package, the 64 bit VM still
>   needs more testing).
>
>
>
> To get Pharo up and running on Ubuntu 16.04 or later:
>
> # Install Pharo
> $ sudo snap install --candidate pharo --classic
> # If your system isn't configured for threaded heartbeat:
> $ sudo pharo.config
> # Download the latest Pharo 6 image
> $ pharo.getimage
> # Go...
> $ pharo.ui Pharo.image
> # or:
> $ pharo Pharo.image eval 4+3
>
> To get a list of available commands:
>
> $ snap info pharo
>
>
> If you're on Debian or Ubuntu 14.04 you'll need to install snapd, see
> https://snapcraft.io/docs/core/install
>
>
> The VM is the threaded heartbeat, dated 201705310241.
>
> The installation flags are:
>
> --candidate - The edge and beta channels are for development versions.
>   It progresses to candidate and then stable.
> --classic - Snap packages are normally sandboxed for security
>   reasons.  Since Pharo is a development environment
>   in which we want to be able to run any executable,
>   or load any library, it is installed with access to
>   the entire system (as the running user).
>
> Why use snap packages?
>
> - They include all dependencies.  In particular, for the 32 bit
>   versions, this means that it isn't necessary to install all the 32 bit
>   architecture and associated dependencies.
> - Including dependencies means that there shouldn't be any problems with
>   incompatible library versions when upgrading.
>
> Why not use snap packages?
>
> - It's a relatively new technology, with a number of rough edges.
> - There may still be issues with its sandboxing that I haven't
>   discovered yet.
> - Because the package uses classic confinement, it isn't
>   cross-distribution in practice (unfortunately).
>
> Please let me know of any other advantages or disadvantages you think
> should be listed here.
>
> If you don't trust me to configure your system correctly (which requires
> sudo):
>
> - All the scripts that make up the sub-commands are visible, e.g.
> pharo.config can be viewed at /snap/pharo/current/usr/bin/CONFIG
>
>
> The packaging code is at: https://github.com/akgrant43/pharo-snap
>
>
> Cheers,
> Alistair
>



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Re: Pharo 6 snap package

Alistair Grant
In reply to this post by Alistair Grant
On Tue, Jun 13, 2017 at 08:58:31AM +0000, Alistair Grant wrote:

> Hi Everyone,
>
> I've updated the Pharo 6 snap package for Ubuntu.
>
> The major advantages of using the snap package are:
>
> - No need to install all the 32 bit dependencies on a 64 bit system,
>   they're all contained and isolated within the snap package.
> - Automagically distinguish between 32 bit and 64 bit images and run the
>   appropriate VM (as with the ZeroConf package, the 64 bit VM still
>   needs more testing).
>
>
>
> To get Pharo up and running on Ubuntu 16.04 or later:
>
> # Install Pharo
> $ sudo snap install --candidate pharo --classic
> # If your system isn't configured for threaded heartbeat:
> $ sudo pharo.config
> # Download the latest Pharo 6 image
> $ pharo.getimage

I should have added if you want the 32 bit image:

$ pharo.getimage32

the rest remains the same


> # Go...
> $ pharo.ui Pharo.image
> # or:
> $ pharo Pharo.image eval 4+3
>
> To get a list of available commands:
>
> $ snap info pharo
>
>
> If you're on Debian or Ubuntu 14.04 you'll need to install snapd, see
> https://snapcraft.io/docs/core/install
>
>
> The VM is the threaded heartbeat, dated 201705310241.
>
> The installation flags are:
>
> --candidate - The edge and beta channels are for development versions.  
>   It progresses to candidate and then stable.
> --classic - Snap packages are normally sandboxed for security
>   reasons.  Since Pharo is a development environment
>   in which we want to be able to run any executable,
>   or load any library, it is installed with access to
>   the entire system (as the running user).
>
> Why use snap packages?
>
> - They include all dependencies.  In particular, for the 32 bit
>   versions, this means that it isn't necessary to install all the 32 bit
>   architecture and associated dependencies.
> - Including dependencies means that there shouldn't be any problems with
>   incompatible library versions when upgrading.
>
> Why not use snap packages?
>
> - It's a relatively new technology, with a number of rough edges.
> - There may still be issues with its sandboxing that I haven't
>   discovered yet.
> - Because the package uses classic confinement, it isn't
>   cross-distribution in practice (unfortunately).
>
> Please let me know of any other advantages or disadvantages you think
> should be listed here.
>
> If you don't trust me to configure your system correctly (which requires
> sudo):
>
> - All the scripts that make up the sub-commands are visible, e.g.
> pharo.config can be viewed at /snap/pharo/current/usr/bin/CONFIG
>
>
> The packaging code is at: https://github.com/akgrant43/pharo-snap
>
>
> Cheers,
> Alistair

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Re: Pharo 6 snap package

Alistair Grant
In reply to this post by philippeback
On Tue, Jun 13, 2017 at 11:25:15AM +0200, [hidden email] wrote:
> I need to upgrade to 16.04 now :-)

:-)

Don't forget you can install snapd on Ubuntu 14.04:

https://snapcraft.io/docs/core/install-ubuntu

Cheers,
Alistair


> Phil
>
> On Tue, Jun 13, 2017 at 11:04 AM, Stephane Ducasse <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>
>     THANKS A LOT ALISTAIR.
>     I mean it :)
>
>     On Tue, Jun 13, 2017 at 10:58 AM, Alistair Grant <[hidden email]>
>     wrote:
>     > Hi Everyone,
>     >
>     > I've updated the Pharo 6 snap package for Ubuntu.
>     >
>     > The major advantages of using the snap package are:
>     >
>     > - No need to install all the 32 bit dependencies on a 64 bit system,
>     >   they're all contained and isolated within the snap package.
>     > - Automagically distinguish between 32 bit and 64 bit images and run the
>     >   appropriate VM (as with the ZeroConf package, the 64 bit VM still
>     >   needs more testing).
>     >
>     >
>     >
>     > To get Pharo up and running on Ubuntu 16.04 or later:
>     >
>     > # Install Pharo
>     > $ sudo snap install --candidate pharo --classic
>     > # If your system isn't configured for threaded heartbeat:
>     > $ sudo pharo.config
>     > # Download the latest Pharo 6 image
>     > $ pharo.getimage
>     > # Go...
>     > $ pharo.ui Pharo.image
>     > # or:
>     > $ pharo Pharo.image eval 4+3
>     >
>     > To get a list of available commands:
>     >
>     > $ snap info pharo
>     >
>     >
>     > If you're on Debian or Ubuntu 14.04 you'll need to install snapd, see
>     > https://snapcraft.io/docs/core/install
>     >
>     >
>     > The VM is the threaded heartbeat, dated 201705310241.
>     >
>     > The installation flags are:
>     >
>     > --candidate - The edge and beta channels are for development versions.
>     >   It progresses to candidate and then stable.
>     > --classic - Snap packages are normally sandboxed for security
>     >   reasons.  Since Pharo is a development environment
>     >   in which we want to be able to run any executable,
>     >   or load any library, it is installed with access to
>     >   the entire system (as the running user).
>     >
>     > Why use snap packages?
>     >
>     > - They include all dependencies.  In particular, for the 32 bit
>     >   versions, this means that it isn't necessary to install all the 32 bit
>     >   architecture and associated dependencies.
>     > - Including dependencies means that there shouldn't be any problems with
>     >   incompatible library versions when upgrading.
>     >
>     > Why not use snap packages?
>     >
>     > - It's a relatively new technology, with a number of rough edges.
>     > - There may still be issues with its sandboxing that I haven't
>     >   discovered yet.
>     > - Because the package uses classic confinement, it isn't
>     >   cross-distribution in practice (unfortunately).
>     >
>     > Please let me know of any other advantages or disadvantages you think
>     > should be listed here.
>     >
>     > If you don't trust me to configure your system correctly (which requires
>     > sudo):
>     >
>     > - All the scripts that make up the sub-commands are visible, e.g.
>     > pharo.config can be viewed at /snap/pharo/current/usr/bin/CONFIG
>     >
>     >
>     > The packaging code is at: https://github.com/akgrant43/pharo-snap
>     >
>     >
>     > Cheers,
>     > Alistair

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Re: Pharo 6 snap package

philippeback
On Tue, Jun 13, 2017 at 11:34 AM, Alistair Grant <[hidden email]> wrote:
On Tue, Jun 13, 2017 at 11:25:15AM +0200, [hidden email] wrote:
> I need to upgrade to 16.04 now :-)

:-)

Don't forget you can install snapd on Ubuntu 14.04:

https://snapcraft.io/docs/core/install-ubuntu


Ah, wasn't aware of that. Thx Alistair!

Phil
 
Cheers,
Alistair


> Phil
>
> On Tue, Jun 13, 2017 at 11:04 AM, Stephane Ducasse <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>
>     THANKS A LOT ALISTAIR.
>     I mean it :)
>
>     On Tue, Jun 13, 2017 at 10:58 AM, Alistair Grant <[hidden email]>
>     wrote:
>     > Hi Everyone,
>     >
>     > I've updated the Pharo 6 snap package for Ubuntu.
>     >
>     > The major advantages of using the snap package are:
>     >
>     > - No need to install all the 32 bit dependencies on a 64 bit system,
>     >   they're all contained and isolated within the snap package.
>     > - Automagically distinguish between 32 bit and 64 bit images and run the
>     >   appropriate VM (as with the ZeroConf package, the 64 bit VM still
>     >   needs more testing).
>     >
>     >
>     >
>     > To get Pharo up and running on Ubuntu 16.04 or later:
>     >
>     > # Install Pharo
>     > $ sudo snap install --candidate pharo --classic
>     > # If your system isn't configured for threaded heartbeat:
>     > $ sudo pharo.config
>     > # Download the latest Pharo 6 image
>     > $ pharo.getimage
>     > # Go...
>     > $ pharo.ui Pharo.image
>     > # or:
>     > $ pharo Pharo.image eval 4+3
>     >
>     > To get a list of available commands:
>     >
>     > $ snap info pharo
>     >
>     >
>     > If you're on Debian or Ubuntu 14.04 you'll need to install snapd, see
>     > https://snapcraft.io/docs/core/install
>     >
>     >
>     > The VM is the threaded heartbeat, dated 201705310241.
>     >
>     > The installation flags are:
>     >
>     > --candidate - The edge and beta channels are for development versions.
>     >   It progresses to candidate and then stable.
>     > --classic - Snap packages are normally sandboxed for security
>     >   reasons.  Since Pharo is a development environment
>     >   in which we want to be able to run any executable,
>     >   or load any library, it is installed with access to
>     >   the entire system (as the running user).
>     >
>     > Why use snap packages?
>     >
>     > - They include all dependencies.  In particular, for the 32 bit
>     >   versions, this means that it isn't necessary to install all the 32 bit
>     >   architecture and associated dependencies.
>     > - Including dependencies means that there shouldn't be any problems with
>     >   incompatible library versions when upgrading.
>     >
>     > Why not use snap packages?
>     >
>     > - It's a relatively new technology, with a number of rough edges.
>     > - There may still be issues with its sandboxing that I haven't
>     >   discovered yet.
>     > - Because the package uses classic confinement, it isn't
>     >   cross-distribution in practice (unfortunately).
>     >
>     > Please let me know of any other advantages or disadvantages you think
>     > should be listed here.
>     >
>     > If you don't trust me to configure your system correctly (which requires
>     > sudo):
>     >
>     > - All the scripts that make up the sub-commands are visible, e.g.
>     > pharo.config can be viewed at /snap/pharo/current/usr/bin/CONFIG
>     >
>     >
>     > The packaging code is at: https://github.com/akgrant43/pharo-snap
>     >
>     >
>     > Cheers,
>     > Alistair



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