Spotter shortcut reset

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Spotter shortcut reset

Ben Coman
I upgraded Pharo 7.0.1 to latest Pharo 8.0 branch.
Now when I hit <Ctrl-Enter> I get a debugger...
     Instance of AnObsoleteGTSpotterGlobalShortcut class did not understand #openGlobalSpotter

Although not a certified way to upgrade, its maybe useful. 
I've looked through settings and class-side methods for some way to reset this.
Is there some class reset or initialization that can be run to clear this up?

cheers -ben
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Re: Spotter shortcut reset

ducasse
Ben

How did you do it?
I downloaded the latest version and Spotter worked well (>I borke it but loading old code from Pharo 60).

Stef

> On 2 Feb 2019, at 10:25, Ben Coman <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> I upgraded Pharo 7.0.1 to latest Pharo 8.0 branch.
> Now when I hit <Ctrl-Enter> I get a debugger...
>      Instance of AnObsoleteGTSpotterGlobalShortcut class did not understand #openGlobalSpotter
>
> Although not a certified way to upgrade, its maybe useful.
> I've looked through settings and class-side methods for some way to reset this.
> Is there some class reset or initialization that can be run to clear this up?
>
> cheers -ben



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Re: Spotter shortcut reset

Ben Coman
On Sat, 2 Feb 2019 at 17:48, ducasse <[hidden email]> wrote:
Ben

How did you do it?
I downloaded the latest version

By "latest version" do you mean direct download of Pharo 8.0

I don't have Pharo 8.0 listed in my Pharo Launcher.
I am getting network errors trying to download latest Pharo Launcher, 
so I created a fresh Pharo 7.0.1 and Spotter works fine out of the box.
Then I used Iceberg to update to Pharo 8.0, this breaks Spotter.
Certainly not the recommended way, but its all I got at the moment to get into Pharo 8.0 development.

cheers -ben
 
and Spotter worked well (>I broke it but loading old code from Pharo 60).

Stef

> On 2 Feb 2019, at 10:25, Ben Coman <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> I upgraded Pharo 7.0.1 to latest Pharo 8.0 branch.
> Now when I hit <Ctrl-Enter> I get a debugger...
>      Instance of AnObsoleteGTSpotterGlobalShortcut class did not understand #openGlobalSpotter
>
> Although not a certified way to upgrade, its maybe useful.
> I've looked through settings and class-side methods for some way to reset this.
> Is there some class reset or initialization that can be run to clear this up?
>
> cheers -ben



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Re: Spotter shortcut reset

Alistair Grant
Hi Ben,
On Sat, 2 Feb 2019 at 11:01, Ben Coman <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> On Sat, 2 Feb 2019 at 17:48, ducasse <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>> Ben
>>
>> How did you do it?
>> I downloaded the latest version
>
>
> By "latest version" do you mean direct download of Pharo 8.0
>
> I don't have Pharo 8.0 listed in my Pharo Launcher.
> I am getting network errors trying to download latest Pharo Launcher,
> so I created a fresh Pharo 7.0.1 and Spotter works fine out of the box.
> Then I used Iceberg to update to Pharo 8.0, this breaks Spotter.
> Certainly not the recommended way, but its all I got at the moment to get into Pharo 8.0 development.

If you've got cygwin, you can use zeroconf:

curl get.pharo.org/80+vm | bash

or download directly:

http://files.pharo.org/image/80/latest-32.zip
http://files.pharo.org/vm/pharo-spur32/win/latest.zip  (I think)

HTH,
Alistair

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Re: Spotter shortcut reset

ducasse
In reply to this post by Ben Coman
Hi ben

I saw that alistair proposed a better way than I did :)
Ben

How did you do it?
I downloaded the latest version

By "latest version" do you mean direct download of Pharo 8.0

I don't have Pharo 8.0 listed in my Pharo Launcher.
I am getting network errors trying to download latest Pharo Launcher, 

can you tell me how so that I try to reproduce it?


so I created a fresh Pharo 7.0.1 and Spotter works fine out of the box.
Then I used Iceberg to update to Pharo 8.0, this breaks Spotter.
Certainly not the recommended way, but its all I got at the moment to get into Pharo 8.0 development.

cheers -ben
 
and Spotter worked well (>I broke it but loading old code from Pharo 60).

Stef

> On 2 Feb 2019, at 10:25, Ben Coman <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> I upgraded Pharo 7.0.1 to latest Pharo 8.0 branch.
> Now when I hit <Ctrl-Enter> I get a debugger...
>      Instance of AnObsoleteGTSpotterGlobalShortcut class did not understand #openGlobalSpotter
>
> Although not a certified way to upgrade, its maybe useful.
> I've looked through settings and class-side methods for some way to reset this.
> Is there some class reset or initialization that can be run to clear this up?
>
> cheers -ben




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Re: Spotter shortcut reset

Ben Coman

On Sat, 2 Feb 2019 at 18:54, ducasse <[hidden email]> wrote:
> On Sat, 2 Feb 2019 at 11:01, Ben Coman <[hidden email]> wrote:  
>
> > I am getting network errors trying to download latest Pharo Launcher,
>
> can you tell me how so that I try to reproduce it?

Since network performance depends a lot on location, and presuming you'd 
need to be at my house to reproduce my experience, 
I spent the afternoon learning about AWS so I could do some testing from a Australian based cloud box
that you should be able to reproduce fairly easily, since this was my first time using AWS.

With this 10 minute tutorial...
[Launch a Linux Virtual Machine](https://aws.amazon.com/getting-started/tutorials/launch-a-virtual-machine/)
1. Signed up and signed in
Tip: I struggled a long while looping on "Sign in with root account credentials" until I discovered I needed to use the email address I signed up with, not the account name.

[Edit:] In the top right between account name and support,
pulled down list and selected "Asia Pacfic (Sydney)"


2. Clicked "Launch a virtual machine"    
(note, that only seems to show up for blank account, otherwise its "Launch Instance"


3. Ticked "Free tier only" filter.
+ Selected "Amazon Linux 2 AMI (HVM), SSD Volume Type"   
+ Clicked <Review and Launch>  (used default t2.micro)
+ Clicked <Launch>
+ From the pull-down selected "Create a new key pair",
gave it a name and clicked <Download Keypair> saved as "SydneyPharoSpeedTest.pem"
+ Clicked <Launch Instance>
+ Clicked <View Instances>
noted instance...
* IP address: 54.252.136.78
* Zone: ap-southeast-2b
* Security Group: Launch Wizard 1

4. On my Windows 10 box, in WSL did... 
$ cd ~/.ssh       # if it doesn't exist, first do...   mkdir -m 700 ~/.ssh
$ cp /mnt/c/Users/Ben/Downloads/SydneyPharoSpeedTest.pem   ~/.ssh
$ chmod 400 ~/.ssh/SydneyPharoSpeedTest.pem
$ ssh -i ~/.ssh/SydneyPharoSpeedTest.pem  [hidden email]$ cat /etc/os-release
ID="amzn"
ID_LIKE="centos rhel fedora"


GOOD NETWORK BASELINE TEST...
Ignoring any packet loss on poor networks, first testing low bandwidths on a good network
$ vi test.sh
#!/bin/sh
if [ -d out ]; then
    dirdate=`stat -c %z out | awk '{print $1"-"$2}' `
    mv out out.${dirdate}
fi
mkdir out
for RATE in 1000k 500k 200k 100k 50k 20k 10k 5k 2k 1k
do
  echo $RATE
  /usr/bin/time -f "%e" -o out/time.$RATE \
       wget --quiet --limit-rate $RATE https://files.pharo.org/pharo-launcher/1.6/pharo-launcher-1.6.msi -O out/file.$RATE &
done

$ sh test.sh
monitoring with...
$ cat out/time* | sort -n
$ ls -lS out

results in following table and graphs...
$RATE
(kb/s)
TIME
(s)
TIME
(min)
TIME
(hr)
1000 54 1 0.0
500 105 2 0.0
200 259 4 0.1
100 515 9 0.1
50 1029 17 0.3
20 2576 43 0.7
10 5149 86 1.4
5 10527 175 2.9

download-speed.png

Wow that surprised me.  I'm not sure what the behaviour of file servers at low bandwidth should be,
but intuitively the above seems odd.  In the past troubleshooting seems to have been 
focused on the cause of slow speeds, but these can occur for many reasons unrelated to the 
the file server.  The above test ignores cause to isolate behaviour at slow speeds.

I forgot my own download speed yesterday (today is okay), but here is another sample...
"(in Argentina) it is really slow ... 3.5KB/s ... average 10KB/s".

I would hope that download time was near linear with speed all the way down to 1kb/s. 
Anyone have some sysadmins they can lean on to understand if that is realistic?

The straightness of the line using a log-log axis makes it seem like policy rather than physics.
download-speed(log).png

HTH,
cheers -ben
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Re: Spotter shortcut reset

ducasse
Wouahhhhhh you are not playing :)
This is cool. 
My network at home is lame to the dispear of my sons. 

Stef


On 3 Feb 2019, at 12:06, Ben Coman <[hidden email]> wrote:


On Sat, 2 Feb 2019 at 18:54, ducasse <[hidden email]> wrote:
> On Sat, 2 Feb 2019 at 11:01, Ben Coman <[hidden email]> wrote:  
>
> > I am getting network errors trying to download latest Pharo Launcher,
>
> can you tell me how so that I try to reproduce it?

Since network performance depends a lot on location, and presuming you'd 
need to be at my house to reproduce my experience, 
I spent the afternoon learning about AWS so I could do some testing from a Australian based cloud box
that you should be able to reproduce fairly easily, since this was my first time using AWS.

With this 10 minute tutorial...
[Launch a Linux Virtual Machine](https://aws.amazon.com/getting-started/tutorials/launch-a-virtual-machine/)
1. Signed up and signed in
Tip: I struggled a long while looping on "Sign in with root account credentials" until I discovered I needed to use the email address I signed up with, not the account name.

[Edit:] In the top right between account name and support,
pulled down list and selected "Asia Pacfic (Sydney)"


2. Clicked "Launch a virtual machine"    
(note, that only seems to show up for blank account, otherwise its "Launch Instance"


3. Ticked "Free tier only" filter.
+ Selected "Amazon Linux 2 AMI (HVM), SSD Volume Type"   
+ Clicked <Review and Launch>  (used default t2.micro)
+ Clicked <Launch>
+ From the pull-down selected "Create a new key pair",
gave it a name and clicked <Download Keypair> saved as "SydneyPharoSpeedTest.pem"
+ Clicked <Launch Instance>
+ Clicked <View Instances>
noted instance...
* IP address: 54.252.136.78
* Zone: ap-southeast-2b
* Security Group: Launch Wizard 1

4. On my Windows 10 box, in WSL did... 
$ cd ~/.ssh       # if it doesn't exist, first do...   mkdir -m 700 ~/.ssh
$ cp /mnt/c/Users/Ben/Downloads/SydneyPharoSpeedTest.pem   ~/.ssh
$ chmod 400 ~/.ssh/SydneyPharoSpeedTest.pem
$ ssh -i ~/.ssh/SydneyPharoSpeedTest.pem  [hidden email]$ cat /etc/os-release
ID="amzn"
ID_LIKE="centos rhel fedora"


GOOD NETWORK BASELINE TEST...
Ignoring any packet loss on poor networks, first testing low bandwidths on a good network
$ vi test.sh
#!/bin/sh
if [ -d out ]; then
    dirdate=`stat -c %z out | awk '{print $1"-"$2}' `
    mv out out.${dirdate}
fi
mkdir out
for RATE in 1000k 500k 200k 100k 50k 20k 10k 5k 2k 1k
do
  echo $RATE
  /usr/bin/time -f "%e" -o out/time.$RATE \
       wget --quiet --limit-rate $RATE https://files.pharo.org/pharo-launcher/1.6/pharo-launcher-1.6.msi -O out/file.$RATE &
done

$ sh test.sh
monitoring with...
$ cat out/time* | sort -n
$ ls -lS out

results in following table and graphs...
$RATE
(kb/s)
TIME
(s)
TIME
(min)
TIME
(hr)
1000 54 1 0.0
500 105 2 0.0
200 259 4 0.1
100 515 9 0.1
50 1029 17 0.3
20 2576 43 0.7
10 5149 86 1.4
5 10527 175 2.9

<download-speed.png>

Wow that surprised me.  I'm not sure what the behaviour of file servers at low bandwidth should be,
but intuitively the above seems odd.  In the past troubleshooting seems to have been 
focused on the cause of slow speeds, but these can occur for many reasons unrelated to the 
the file server.  The above test ignores cause to isolate behaviour at slow speeds.

I forgot my own download speed yesterday (today is okay), but here is another sample...
"(in Argentina) it is really slow ... 3.5KB/s ... average 10KB/s".

I would hope that download time was near linear with speed all the way down to 1kb/s. 
Anyone have some sysadmins they can lean on to understand if that is realistic?

The straightness of the line using a log-log axis makes it seem like policy rather than physics.
<download-speed(log).png>

HTH,
cheers -ben

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Re: Spotter shortcut reset

ducasse
In reply to this post by Ben Coman
I asked christophe to not miss your email and see if this is something from our side. 

Stef

On 3 Feb 2019, at 12:06, Ben Coman <[hidden email]> wrote:


On Sat, 2 Feb 2019 at 18:54, ducasse <[hidden email]> wrote:
> On Sat, 2 Feb 2019 at 11:01, Ben Coman <[hidden email]> wrote:  
>
> > I am getting network errors trying to download latest Pharo Launcher,
>
> can you tell me how so that I try to reproduce it?

Since network performance depends a lot on location, and presuming you'd 
need to be at my house to reproduce my experience, 
I spent the afternoon learning about AWS so I could do some testing from a Australian based cloud box
that you should be able to reproduce fairly easily, since this was my first time using AWS.

With this 10 minute tutorial...
[Launch a Linux Virtual Machine](https://aws.amazon.com/getting-started/tutorials/launch-a-virtual-machine/)
1. Signed up and signed in
Tip: I struggled a long while looping on "Sign in with root account credentials" until I discovered I needed to use the email address I signed up with, not the account name.

[Edit:] In the top right between account name and support,
pulled down list and selected "Asia Pacfic (Sydney)"


2. Clicked "Launch a virtual machine"    
(note, that only seems to show up for blank account, otherwise its "Launch Instance"


3. Ticked "Free tier only" filter.
+ Selected "Amazon Linux 2 AMI (HVM), SSD Volume Type"   
+ Clicked <Review and Launch>  (used default t2.micro)
+ Clicked <Launch>
+ From the pull-down selected "Create a new key pair",
gave it a name and clicked <Download Keypair> saved as "SydneyPharoSpeedTest.pem"
+ Clicked <Launch Instance>
+ Clicked <View Instances>
noted instance...
* IP address: 54.252.136.78
* Zone: ap-southeast-2b
* Security Group: Launch Wizard 1

4. On my Windows 10 box, in WSL did... 
$ cd ~/.ssh       # if it doesn't exist, first do...   mkdir -m 700 ~/.ssh
$ cp /mnt/c/Users/Ben/Downloads/SydneyPharoSpeedTest.pem   ~/.ssh
$ chmod 400 ~/.ssh/SydneyPharoSpeedTest.pem
$ ssh -i ~/.ssh/SydneyPharoSpeedTest.pem  [hidden email]$ cat /etc/os-release
ID="amzn"
ID_LIKE="centos rhel fedora"


GOOD NETWORK BASELINE TEST...
Ignoring any packet loss on poor networks, first testing low bandwidths on a good network
$ vi test.sh
#!/bin/sh
if [ -d out ]; then
    dirdate=`stat -c %z out | awk '{print $1"-"$2}' `
    mv out out.${dirdate}
fi
mkdir out
for RATE in 1000k 500k 200k 100k 50k 20k 10k 5k 2k 1k
do
  echo $RATE
  /usr/bin/time -f "%e" -o out/time.$RATE \
       wget --quiet --limit-rate $RATE https://files.pharo.org/pharo-launcher/1.6/pharo-launcher-1.6.msi -O out/file.$RATE &
done

$ sh test.sh
monitoring with...
$ cat out/time* | sort -n
$ ls -lS out

results in following table and graphs...
$RATE
(kb/s)
TIME
(s)
TIME
(min)
TIME
(hr)
1000 54 1 0.0
500 105 2 0.0
200 259 4 0.1
100 515 9 0.1
50 1029 17 0.3
20 2576 43 0.7
10 5149 86 1.4
5 10527 175 2.9

<download-speed.png>

Wow that surprised me.  I'm not sure what the behaviour of file servers at low bandwidth should be,
but intuitively the above seems odd.  In the past troubleshooting seems to have been 
focused on the cause of slow speeds, but these can occur for many reasons unrelated to the 
the file server.  The above test ignores cause to isolate behaviour at slow speeds.

I forgot my own download speed yesterday (today is okay), but here is another sample...
"(in Argentina) it is really slow ... 3.5KB/s ... average 10KB/s".

I would hope that download time was near linear with speed all the way down to 1kb/s. 
Anyone have some sysadmins they can lean on to understand if that is realistic?

The straightness of the line using a log-log axis makes it seem like policy rather than physics.
<download-speed(log).png>

HTH,
cheers -ben

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Re: Spotter shortcut reset

webwarrior
In reply to this post by Ben Coman
Ben Coman wrote
> On Sat, 2 Feb 2019 at 18:54, ducasse &lt;

> stepharo@

> &gt; wrote:
>
> ...
>
> 3. Ticked "Free tier only" filter.
> + Selected "Amazon Linux 2 AMI (HVM), SSD Volume Type"
> + Clicked
> <Review and Launch>
>   (used default t2.micro)
> + Clicked
> <Launch>
> + From the pull-down selected "Create a new key pair",
> gave it a name and clicked
> <Download Keypair>
>  saved as
> "SydneyPharoSpeedTest.pem"
> + Clicked
> <Launch Instance>
> + Clicked
> <View Instances>
> noted instance...
> * IP address: 54.252.136.78
> * Zone: ap-southeast-2b
> * Security Group: Launch Wizard 1
>
> 4. On my Windows 10 box, in WSL did...
> $ cd ~/.ssh       # if it doesn't exist, first do...   mkdir -m 700 ~/.ssh
> $ cp /mnt/c/Users/Ben/Downloads/SydneyPharoSpeedTest.pem   ~/.ssh
> $ chmod 400 ~/.ssh/SydneyPharoSpeedTest.pem
> $ ssh -i ~/.ssh/SydneyPharoSpeedTest.pem  ubuntu@54.252.136.78$ cat
> /etc/os-release
> ID="amzn"
> ID_LIKE="centos rhel fedora"
>
>
> GOOD NETWORK BASELINE TEST...
> Ignoring any packet loss on poor networks, first testing low bandwidths on
> a good network
> $ vi test.sh
> #!/bin/sh
> if [ -d out ]; then
>     dirdate=`stat -c %z out | awk '{print $1"-"$2}' `
>     mv out out.${dirdate}
> fi
> mkdir out
> for RATE in 1000k 500k 200k 100k 50k 20k 10k 5k 2k 1k
> do
>   echo $RATE
>   /usr/bin/time -f "%e" -o out/time.$RATE \
>        wget --quiet --limit-rate $RATE
> https://files.pharo.org/pharo-launcher/1.6/pharo-launcher-1.6.msi -O
> out/file.$RATE &
> done
>
> $ sh test.sh
> monitoring with...
> $ cat out/time* | sort -n
> $ ls -lS out
>
> results in following table and graphs...
> $RATE
> (kb/s) TIME
> (s) TIME
> (min) TIME
> (hr)
> 1000 54 1 0.0
> 500 105 2 0.0
> 200 259 4 0.1
> 100 515 9 0.1
> 50 1029 17 0.3
> 20 2576 43 0.7
> 10 5149 86 1.4
> 5 10527 175 2.9
>
> [image: download-speed.png]
>
> Wow that surprised me.  I'm not sure what the behaviour of file servers at
> low bandwidth should be,
> but intuitively the above seems odd.  In the past troubleshooting seems to
> have been
> focused on the cause of slow speeds, but these can occur for many reasons
> unrelated to the
> the file server.  The above test ignores cause to isolate behaviour at
> slow
> speeds.
>
> I forgot my own download speed yesterday (today is okay), but here is
> another sample...
> "(in Argentina) it is really slow ... 3.5KB/s ... average 10KB/s".
> http://forum.world.st/Pharo-Downloads-are-sluggish-td5084963.html
>
> I would hope that download time was near linear with speed all the way
> down
> to 1kb/s.
> Anyone have some sysadmins they can lean on to understand if that is
> realistic?
>
> The straightness of the line using a log-log axis makes it seem like
> policy
> rather than physics.
> [image: download-speed(log).png]
>
> HTH,
> cheers -ben
>
>
> download-speed.png (39K)
> &lt;http://forum.world.st/attachment/5094677/0/download-speed.png&gt;
> download-speed(log).png (34K)
> &lt;http://forum.world.st/attachment/5094677/1/download-speed%28log%29.png&gt;

Why does that surprise you?

Download time [s] = amount of data [B] / bandwidth [B/s].
Your data and graphs look exatly like they should. When bandwidth -> 0, time
-> +infinity.




--
Sent from: http://forum.world.st/Pharo-Smalltalk-Developers-f1294837.html

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Re: Spotter shortcut reset

Ben Coman


On Sun, 3 Feb 2019 at 23:25, webwarrior <[hidden email]> wrote:
Ben Coman wrote
> On Sat, 2 Feb 2019 at 18:54, ducasse &lt;

> stepharo@

> &gt; wrote:
>
> ...
>
> 3. Ticked "Free tier only" filter.
> + Selected "Amazon Linux 2 AMI (HVM), SSD Volume Type"
> + Clicked
> <Review and Launch>
>   (used default t2.micro)
> + Clicked
> <Launch>
> + From the pull-down selected "Create a new key pair",
> gave it a name and clicked
> <Download Keypair>
>  saved as
> "SydneyPharoSpeedTest.pem"
> + Clicked
> <Launch Instance>
> + Clicked
> <View Instances>
> noted instance...
> * IP address: 54.252.136.78
> * Zone: ap-southeast-2b
> * Security Group: Launch Wizard 1
>
> 4. On my Windows 10 box, in WSL did...
> $ cd ~/.ssh       # if it doesn't exist, first do...   mkdir -m 700 ~/.ssh
> $ cp /mnt/c/Users/Ben/Downloads/SydneyPharoSpeedTest.pem   ~/.ssh
> $ chmod 400 ~/.ssh/SydneyPharoSpeedTest.pem
> $ ssh -i ~/.ssh/SydneyPharoSpeedTest.pem  [hidden email]$ cat
> /etc/os-release
> ID="amzn"
> ID_LIKE="centos rhel fedora"
>
>
> GOOD NETWORK BASELINE TEST...
> Ignoring any packet loss on poor networks, first testing low bandwidths on
> a good network
> $ vi test.sh
> #!/bin/sh
> if [ -d out ]; then
>     dirdate=`stat -c %z out | awk '{print $1"-"$2}' `
>     mv out out.${dirdate}
> fi
> mkdir out
> for RATE in 1000k 500k 200k 100k 50k 20k 10k 5k 2k 1k
> do
>   echo $RATE
>   /usr/bin/time -f "%e" -o out/time.$RATE \
>        wget --quiet --limit-rate $RATE
> https://files.pharo.org/pharo-launcher/1.6/pharo-launcher-1.6.msi -O
> out/file.$RATE &
> done
>
> $ sh test.sh
> monitoring with...
> $ cat out/time* | sort -n
> $ ls -lS out
>
> results in following table and graphs...
> $RATE
> (kb/s) TIME
> (s) TIME
> (min) TIME
> (hr)
> 1000 54 1 0.0
> 500 105 2 0.0
> 200 259 4 0.1
> 100 515 9 0.1
> 50 1029 17 0.3
> 20 2576 43 0.7
> 10 5149 86 1.4
> 5 10527 175 2.9
>
> [image: download-speed.png]
>
> Wow that surprised me.  I'm not sure what the behaviour of file servers at
> low bandwidth should be,
> but intuitively the above seems odd.  In the past troubleshooting seems to
> have been
> focused on the cause of slow speeds, but these can occur for many reasons
> unrelated to the
> the file server.  The above test ignores cause to isolate behaviour at
> slow
> speeds.
>
> I forgot my own download speed yesterday (today is okay), but here is
> another sample...
> "(in Argentina) it is really slow ... 3.5KB/s ... average 10KB/s".
> http://forum.world.st/Pharo-Downloads-are-sluggish-td5084963.html
>
> I would hope that download time was near linear with speed all the way
> down
> to 1kb/s.
> Anyone have some sysadmins they can lean on to understand if that is
> realistic?
>
> The straightness of the line using a log-log axis makes it seem like
> policy
> rather than physics.
> [image: download-speed(log).png]
>
> HTH,
> cheers -ben
>
>
> download-speed.png (39K)
> &lt;http://forum.world.st/attachment/5094677/0/download-speed.png&gt;
> download-speed(log).png (34K)
> &lt;http://forum.world.st/attachment/5094677/1/download-speed%28log%29.png&gt;

Why does that surprise you?

Download time [s] = amount of data [B] / bandwidth [B/s].
Your data and graphs look exactly like they should. When bandwidth -> 0, time
-> +infinity.

Hey! Thanks for that reality check. 
100kb ==> 515s
10kb ==>  5149s  
duh! makes perfect sense.  I was sure I had checked that simple scaling
and it had been out by another magnitude, but I must have had a screw loose 
from being too caught up in the graph.  
It was just meant to be a prelude baseline before playing with random packet loss.
Sorry for the noise.

cheers -ben
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Re: Spotter shortcut reset

Nicolas Cellier
In reply to this post by ducasse
Ben,
The figures in the table are quite linear.
Duration * rate = constant.

It's just that you want to plot 1/ duration or 1/ rate if you don't want to see an hyperbole x×y=cte

Le dim. 3 févr. 2019 à 12:17, ducasse <[hidden email]> a écrit :
Wouahhhhhh you are not playing :)
This is cool. 
My network at home is lame to the dispear of my sons. 

Stef


On 3 Feb 2019, at 12:06, Ben Coman <[hidden email]> wrote:


On Sat, 2 Feb 2019 at 18:54, ducasse <[hidden email]> wrote:
> On Sat, 2 Feb 2019 at 11:01, Ben Coman <[hidden email]> wrote:  
>
> > I am getting network errors trying to download latest Pharo Launcher,
>
> can you tell me how so that I try to reproduce it?

Since network performance depends a lot on location, and presuming you'd 
need to be at my house to reproduce my experience, 
I spent the afternoon learning about AWS so I could do some testing from a Australian based cloud box
that you should be able to reproduce fairly easily, since this was my first time using AWS.

With this 10 minute tutorial...
[Launch a Linux Virtual Machine](https://aws.amazon.com/getting-started/tutorials/launch-a-virtual-machine/)
1. Signed up and signed in
Tip: I struggled a long while looping on "Sign in with root account credentials" until I discovered I needed to use the email address I signed up with, not the account name.

[Edit:] In the top right between account name and support,
pulled down list and selected "Asia Pacfic (Sydney)"


2. Clicked "Launch a virtual machine"    
(note, that only seems to show up for blank account, otherwise its "Launch Instance"


3. Ticked "Free tier only" filter.
+ Selected "Amazon Linux 2 AMI (HVM), SSD Volume Type"   
+ Clicked <Review and Launch>  (used default t2.micro)
+ Clicked <Launch>
+ From the pull-down selected "Create a new key pair",
gave it a name and clicked <Download Keypair> saved as "SydneyPharoSpeedTest.pem"
+ Clicked <Launch Instance>
+ Clicked <View Instances>
noted instance...
* IP address: 54.252.136.78
* Zone: ap-southeast-2b
* Security Group: Launch Wizard 1

4. On my Windows 10 box, in WSL did... 
$ cd ~/.ssh       # if it doesn't exist, first do...   mkdir -m 700 ~/.ssh
$ cp /mnt/c/Users/Ben/Downloads/SydneyPharoSpeedTest.pem   ~/.ssh
$ chmod 400 ~/.ssh/SydneyPharoSpeedTest.pem
$ ssh -i ~/.ssh/SydneyPharoSpeedTest.pem  [hidden email]$ cat /etc/os-release
ID="amzn"
ID_LIKE="centos rhel fedora"


GOOD NETWORK BASELINE TEST...
Ignoring any packet loss on poor networks, first testing low bandwidths on a good network
$ vi test.sh
#!/bin/sh
if [ -d out ]; then
    dirdate=`stat -c %z out | awk '{print $1"-"$2}' `
    mv out out.${dirdate}
fi
mkdir out
for RATE in 1000k 500k 200k 100k 50k 20k 10k 5k 2k 1k
do
  echo $RATE
  /usr/bin/time -f "%e" -o out/time.$RATE \
       wget --quiet --limit-rate $RATE https://files.pharo.org/pharo-launcher/1.6/pharo-launcher-1.6.msi -O out/file.$RATE &
done

$ sh test.sh
monitoring with...
$ cat out/time* | sort -n
$ ls -lS out

results in following table and graphs...
$RATE
(kb/s)
TIME
(s)
TIME
(min)
TIME
(hr)
1000 54 1 0.0
500 105 2 0.0
200 259 4 0.1
100 515 9 0.1
50 1029 17 0.3
20 2576 43 0.7
10 5149 86 1.4
5 10527 175 2.9

<download-speed.png>

Wow that surprised me.  I'm not sure what the behaviour of file servers at low bandwidth should be,
but intuitively the above seems odd.  In the past troubleshooting seems to have been 
focused on the cause of slow speeds, but these can occur for many reasons unrelated to the 
the file server.  The above test ignores cause to isolate behaviour at slow speeds.

I forgot my own download speed yesterday (today is okay), but here is another sample...
"(in Argentina) it is really slow ... 3.5KB/s ... average 10KB/s".

I would hope that download time was near linear with speed all the way down to 1kb/s. 
Anyone have some sysadmins they can lean on to understand if that is realistic?

The straightness of the line using a log-log axis makes it seem like policy rather than physics.
<download-speed(log).png>

HTH,
cheers -ben

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Re: Spotter shortcut reset

Nicolas Cellier
Oups, it seems that my mail client was lagging...

Le dim. 3 févr. 2019 à 17:19, Nicolas Cellier <[hidden email]> a écrit :
Ben,
The figures in the table are quite linear.
Duration * rate = constant.

It's just that you want to plot 1/ duration or 1/ rate if you don't want to see an hyperbole x×y=cte

Le dim. 3 févr. 2019 à 12:17, ducasse <[hidden email]> a écrit :
Wouahhhhhh you are not playing :)
This is cool. 
My network at home is lame to the dispear of my sons. 

Stef


On 3 Feb 2019, at 12:06, Ben Coman <[hidden email]> wrote:


On Sat, 2 Feb 2019 at 18:54, ducasse <[hidden email]> wrote:
> On Sat, 2 Feb 2019 at 11:01, Ben Coman <[hidden email]> wrote:  
>
> > I am getting network errors trying to download latest Pharo Launcher,
>
> can you tell me how so that I try to reproduce it?

Since network performance depends a lot on location, and presuming you'd 
need to be at my house to reproduce my experience, 
I spent the afternoon learning about AWS so I could do some testing from a Australian based cloud box
that you should be able to reproduce fairly easily, since this was my first time using AWS.

With this 10 minute tutorial...
[Launch a Linux Virtual Machine](https://aws.amazon.com/getting-started/tutorials/launch-a-virtual-machine/)
1. Signed up and signed in
Tip: I struggled a long while looping on "Sign in with root account credentials" until I discovered I needed to use the email address I signed up with, not the account name.

[Edit:] In the top right between account name and support,
pulled down list and selected "Asia Pacfic (Sydney)"


2. Clicked "Launch a virtual machine"    
(note, that only seems to show up for blank account, otherwise its "Launch Instance"


3. Ticked "Free tier only" filter.
+ Selected "Amazon Linux 2 AMI (HVM), SSD Volume Type"   
+ Clicked <Review and Launch>  (used default t2.micro)
+ Clicked <Launch>
+ From the pull-down selected "Create a new key pair",
gave it a name and clicked <Download Keypair> saved as "SydneyPharoSpeedTest.pem"
+ Clicked <Launch Instance>
+ Clicked <View Instances>
noted instance...
* IP address: 54.252.136.78
* Zone: ap-southeast-2b
* Security Group: Launch Wizard 1

4. On my Windows 10 box, in WSL did... 
$ cd ~/.ssh       # if it doesn't exist, first do...   mkdir -m 700 ~/.ssh
$ cp /mnt/c/Users/Ben/Downloads/SydneyPharoSpeedTest.pem   ~/.ssh
$ chmod 400 ~/.ssh/SydneyPharoSpeedTest.pem
$ ssh -i ~/.ssh/SydneyPharoSpeedTest.pem  [hidden email]$ cat /etc/os-release
ID="amzn"
ID_LIKE="centos rhel fedora"


GOOD NETWORK BASELINE TEST...
Ignoring any packet loss on poor networks, first testing low bandwidths on a good network
$ vi test.sh
#!/bin/sh
if [ -d out ]; then
    dirdate=`stat -c %z out | awk '{print $1"-"$2}' `
    mv out out.${dirdate}
fi
mkdir out
for RATE in 1000k 500k 200k 100k 50k 20k 10k 5k 2k 1k
do
  echo $RATE
  /usr/bin/time -f "%e" -o out/time.$RATE \
       wget --quiet --limit-rate $RATE https://files.pharo.org/pharo-launcher/1.6/pharo-launcher-1.6.msi -O out/file.$RATE &
done

$ sh test.sh
monitoring with...
$ cat out/time* | sort -n
$ ls -lS out

results in following table and graphs...
$RATE
(kb/s)
TIME
(s)
TIME
(min)
TIME
(hr)
1000 54 1 0.0
500 105 2 0.0
200 259 4 0.1
100 515 9 0.1
50 1029 17 0.3
20 2576 43 0.7
10 5149 86 1.4
5 10527 175 2.9

<download-speed.png>

Wow that surprised me.  I'm not sure what the behaviour of file servers at low bandwidth should be,
but intuitively the above seems odd.  In the past troubleshooting seems to have been 
focused on the cause of slow speeds, but these can occur for many reasons unrelated to the 
the file server.  The above test ignores cause to isolate behaviour at slow speeds.

I forgot my own download speed yesterday (today is okay), but here is another sample...
"(in Argentina) it is really slow ... 3.5KB/s ... average 10KB/s".

I would hope that download time was near linear with speed all the way down to 1kb/s. 
Anyone have some sysadmins they can lean on to understand if that is realistic?

The straightness of the line using a log-log axis makes it seem like policy rather than physics.
<download-speed(log).png>

HTH,
cheers -ben