Differential and Integral calculus in Pharo?

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Differential and Integral calculus in Pharo?

Clara Allende
Hi guys, after having exhausting four months of Physics lessons, I decided that would be fun to write a program to deal with Electricity problems :) (Yeah, I'm not a normal person :P)

So, I need to make differential and integral calculus, are there any libraries to do so? Or any place that I can take a look at? 

Thanks in advance!

Cheers
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Re: Differential and Integral calculus in Pharo?

Igor Stasenko
On 2 August 2012 00:03, Clara Allende <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Hi guys, after having exhausting four months of Physics lessons, I decided
> that would be fun to write a program to deal with Electricity problems :)
> (Yeah, I'm not a normal person :P)

welcome to the club! :)

>
> So, I need to make differential and integral calculus, are there any
> libraries to do so? Or any place that I can take a look at?
>
sorry no idea.. i posted just to welcome , and i usually inhabiting a
lowest depths of our beautiful
world (VM / infrastructure) .. and things you asking about is a bit
too high to me :)

> Thanks in advance!
>
> Cheers



--
Best regards,
Igor Stasenko.

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Re: Differential and Integral calculus in Pharo?

Benjamin Van Ryseghem (Pharo)
Hello :)

I think I have seen such a package on squeaksource once :s

Sorry for not being able to help more :(

Ben

On Aug 2, 2012, at 12:18 AM, Igor Stasenko wrote:

> On 2 August 2012 00:03, Clara Allende <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> Hi guys, after having exhausting four months of Physics lessons, I decided
>> that would be fun to write a program to deal with Electricity problems :)
>> (Yeah, I'm not a normal person :P)
>
> welcome to the club! :)
>
>>
>> So, I need to make differential and integral calculus, are there any
>> libraries to do so? Or any place that I can take a look at?
>>
> sorry no idea.. i posted just to welcome , and i usually inhabiting a
> lowest depths of our beautiful
> world (VM / infrastructure) .. and things you asking about is a bit
> too high to me :)
>
>> Thanks in advance!
>>
>> Cheers
>
>
>
> --
> Best regards,
> Igor Stasenko.
>


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Re: Differential and Integral calculus in Pharo?

Dale Henrichs
Clara,

I am not mathematician, but Serge Stinckwich has a boatload of Math implementations collected in his SciSmalltalk project[1]: "Tools for scientific computation in Smalltalk". He and Daniel Uber have been working together on the project... You might find some of what you are looking for...

[1] https://github.com/SergeStinckwich/SciSmalltalk

----- Original Message -----
| From: "Benjamin" <[hidden email]>
| To: [hidden email]
| Sent: Wednesday, August 1, 2012 4:21:55 PM
| Subject: Re: [Pharo-project] Differential and Integral calculus in Pharo?
|
| Hello :)
|
| I think I have seen such a package on squeaksource once :s
|
| Sorry for not being able to help more :(
|
| Ben
|
| On Aug 2, 2012, at 12:18 AM, Igor Stasenko wrote:
|
| > On 2 August 2012 00:03, Clara Allende <[hidden email]>
| > wrote:
| >> Hi guys, after having exhausting four months of Physics lessons, I
| >> decided
| >> that would be fun to write a program to deal with Electricity
| >> problems :)
| >> (Yeah, I'm not a normal person :P)
| >
| > welcome to the club! :)
| >
| >>
| >> So, I need to make differential and integral calculus, are there
| >> any
| >> libraries to do so? Or any place that I can take a look at?
| >>
| > sorry no idea.. i posted just to welcome , and i usually inhabiting
| > a
| > lowest depths of our beautiful
| > world (VM / infrastructure) .. and things you asking about is a bit
| > too high to me :)
| >
| >> Thanks in advance!
| >>
| >> Cheers
| >
| >
| >
| > --
| > Best regards,
| > Igor Stasenko.
| >
|
|
|

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Re: Differential and Integral calculus in Pharo?

LEnglish
In reply to this post by Clara Allende
Recently, I ran into this: http://maxima.sourceforge.net/

an interface/binding lib might be easier than writing your own from scratch.


L


On 8/1/12 3:03 PM, Clara Allende wrote:

> Hi guys, after having exhausting four months of Physics lessons, I
> decided that would be fun to write a program to deal with Electricity
> problems :) (Yeah, I'm not a normal person :P)
>
> So, I need to make differential and integral calculus, are there any
> libraries to do so? Or any place that I can take a look at?
>
> Thanks in advance!
>
> Cheers


--
Squeak from the very start (introduction to Squeak and Pharo Smalltalk for the (almost) complete and compleate beginner).
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6601A198DF14788D&feature=view_all


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R: Differential and Integral calculus in Pharo?

Lorenzo
In reply to this post by Clara Allende

Hi Clara,

 

you will find a description of MathPackV a pack for mathematics in ST at this link http://www.macqueen.us/smalltalkReport/ST/91_95/SMAL0405.PDF.

 

I bought it some years ago a  version for VSE and I do not know if it is still sold.

If it not sold at present, I am not sure I can give it to you, but I suppose I can extract the parts interesting to you, on which I worked myself.

This package can be very easily ported to Pharo.

If you have any problem, please do not hesitate to get in touch with me.

 

Ciao

 

Lorenzo

 


Da: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] Per conto di Clara Allende
Inviato: giovedì 2 agosto 2012 0.04
A: [hidden email]
Oggetto: [Pharo-project] Differential and Integral calculus in Pharo?

 

Hi guys, after having exhausting four months of Physics lessons, I decided that would be fun to write a program to deal with Electricity problems :) (Yeah, I'm not a normal person :P)

 

So, I need to make differential and integral calculus, are there any libraries to do so? Or any place that I can take a look at? 

 

Thanks in advance!

 

Cheers

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Re: Differential and Integral calculus in Pharo?

SergeStinckwich
In reply to this post by Dale Henrichs
Yes Daniel has done some work in the context of his gsoc.
Daniel can you introduce your work ?

You are welcome if you want to help.
Regards,

Envoyé de mon iPad

Le 2 août 2012 à 06:58, Dale Henrichs <[hidden email]> a écrit :

> Clara,
>
> I am not mathematician, but Serge Stinckwich has a boatload of Math implementations collected in his SciSmalltalk project[1]: "Tools for scientific computation in Smalltalk". He and Daniel Uber have been working together on the project... You might find some of what you are looking for...
>
> [1] https://github.com/SergeStinckwich/SciSmalltalk
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> | From: "Benjamin" <[hidden email]>
> | To: [hidden email]
> | Sent: Wednesday, August 1, 2012 4:21:55 PM
> | Subject: Re: [Pharo-project] Differential and Integral calculus in Pharo?
> |
> | Hello :)
> |
> | I think I have seen such a package on squeaksource once :s
> |
> | Sorry for not being able to help more :(
> |
> | Ben
> |
> | On Aug 2, 2012, at 12:18 AM, Igor Stasenko wrote:
> |
> | > On 2 August 2012 00:03, Clara Allende <[hidden email]>
> | > wrote:
> | >> Hi guys, after having exhausting four months of Physics lessons, I
> | >> decided
> | >> that would be fun to write a program to deal with Electricity
> | >> problems :)
> | >> (Yeah, I'm not a normal person :P)
> | >
> | > welcome to the club! :)
> | >
> | >>
> | >> So, I need to make differential and integral calculus, are there
> | >> any
> | >> libraries to do so? Or any place that I can take a look at?
> | >>
> | > sorry no idea.. i posted just to welcome , and i usually inhabiting
> | > a
> | > lowest depths of our beautiful
> | > world (VM / infrastructure) .. and things you asking about is a bit
> | > too high to me :)
> | >
> | >> Thanks in advance!
> | >>
> | >> Cheers
> | >
> | >
> | >
> | > --
> | > Best regards,
> | > Igor Stasenko.
> | >
> |
> |
> |
>

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Re: Differential and Integral calculus in Pharo?

philippeback
In reply to this post by LEnglish
Maxima is pretty cool indeed. For inspiration, wxMaxima is a UI built on top. That's what we use over here for maths stuff with my wife.
There is also Octave for numerical computing, Maxima being on the symbolic side.


2012/8/2 Lawson English <[hidden email]>
Recently, I ran into this: http://maxima.sourceforge.net/

an interface/binding lib might be easier than writing your own from scratch.


L


On 8/1/12 3:03 PM, Clara Allende wrote:
Hi guys, after having exhausting four months of Physics lessons, I decided that would be fun to write a program to deal with Electricity problems :) (Yeah, I'm not a normal person :P)

So, I need to make differential and integral calculus, are there any libraries to do so? Or any place that I can take a look at?

Thanks in advance!

Cheers


--
Squeak from the very start (introduction to Squeak and Pharo Smalltalk for the (almost) complete and compleate beginner).
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6601A198DF14788D&feature=view_all



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Re: Differential and Integral calculus in Pharo?

Frank Shearar-3
There's also NumPy and SciPy, which you can talk to via OpenQwaq's
(GPL'd) Python-Smalltalk bridge.

frank

On 2 August 2012 10:16, [hidden email] <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Maxima is pretty cool indeed. For inspiration, wxMaxima is a UI built on
> top. That's what we use over here for maths stuff with my wife.
> There is also Octave for numerical computing, Maxima being on the symbolic
> side.
>
>
> 2012/8/2 Lawson English <[hidden email]>
>>
>> Recently, I ran into this: http://maxima.sourceforge.net/
>>
>> an interface/binding lib might be easier than writing your own from
>> scratch.
>>
>>
>> L
>>
>>
>>
>> On 8/1/12 3:03 PM, Clara Allende wrote:
>>>
>>> Hi guys, after having exhausting four months of Physics lessons, I
>>> decided that would be fun to write a program to deal with Electricity
>>> problems :) (Yeah, I'm not a normal person :P)
>>>
>>> So, I need to make differential and integral calculus, are there any
>>> libraries to do so? Or any place that I can take a look at?
>>>
>>> Thanks in advance!
>>>
>>> Cheers
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Squeak from the very start (introduction to Squeak and Pharo Smalltalk for
>> the (almost) complete and compleate beginner).
>> https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6601A198DF14788D&feature=view_all
>>
>>
>

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Re: Differential and Integral calculus in Pharo?

SergeStinckwich
Did you try to use this bridge ?

Envoyé de mon iPhone

Le 2 août 2012 à 16:55, Frank Shearar <[hidden email]> a écrit :

> There's also NumPy and SciPy, which you can talk to via OpenQwaq's
> (GPL'd) Python-Smalltalk bridge.
>
> frank
>
> On 2 August 2012 10:16, [hidden email] <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> Maxima is pretty cool indeed. For inspiration, wxMaxima is a UI built on
>> top. That's what we use over here for maths stuff with my wife.
>> There is also Octave for numerical computing, Maxima being on the symbolic
>> side.
>>
>>
>> 2012/8/2 Lawson English <[hidden email]>
>>>
>>> Recently, I ran into this: http://maxima.sourceforge.net/
>>>
>>> an interface/binding lib might be easier than writing your own from
>>> scratch.
>>>
>>>
>>> L
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> On 8/1/12 3:03 PM, Clara Allende wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Hi guys, after having exhausting four months of Physics lessons, I
>>>> decided that would be fun to write a program to deal with Electricity
>>>> problems :) (Yeah, I'm not a normal person :P)
>>>>
>>>> So, I need to make differential and integral calculus, are there any
>>>> libraries to do so? Or any place that I can take a look at?
>>>>
>>>> Thanks in advance!
>>>>
>>>> Cheers
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Squeak from the very start (introduction to Squeak and Pharo Smalltalk for
>>> the (almost) complete and compleate beginner).
>>> https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6601A198DF14788D&feature=view_all
>>>
>>>
>>
>

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Re: Differential and Integral calculus in Pharo?

Frank Shearar-3
It's not hit the top of my todo list, but it is ON the list. (And it's
on the todo list primarily to try NumPy/SciPy, because those are
libraries most interesting to me.)

frank

On 2 August 2012 11:14, Serge Stinckwich <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Did you try to use this bridge ?
>
> Envoyé de mon iPhone
>
> Le 2 août 2012 à 16:55, Frank Shearar <[hidden email]> a écrit :
>
>> There's also NumPy and SciPy, which you can talk to via OpenQwaq's
>> (GPL'd) Python-Smalltalk bridge.
>>
>> frank
>>
>> On 2 August 2012 10:16, [hidden email] <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>> Maxima is pretty cool indeed. For inspiration, wxMaxima is a UI built on
>>> top. That's what we use over here for maths stuff with my wife.
>>> There is also Octave for numerical computing, Maxima being on the symbolic
>>> side.
>>>
>>>
>>> 2012/8/2 Lawson English <[hidden email]>
>>>>
>>>> Recently, I ran into this: http://maxima.sourceforge.net/
>>>>
>>>> an interface/binding lib might be easier than writing your own from
>>>> scratch.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> L
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On 8/1/12 3:03 PM, Clara Allende wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>> Hi guys, after having exhausting four months of Physics lessons, I
>>>>> decided that would be fun to write a program to deal with Electricity
>>>>> problems :) (Yeah, I'm not a normal person :P)
>>>>>
>>>>> So, I need to make differential and integral calculus, are there any
>>>>> libraries to do so? Or any place that I can take a look at?
>>>>>
>>>>> Thanks in advance!
>>>>>
>>>>> Cheers
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> Squeak from the very start (introduction to Squeak and Pharo Smalltalk for
>>>> the (almost) complete and compleate beginner).
>>>> https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6601A198DF14788D&feature=view_all
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>
>

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Re: Differential and Integral calculus in Pharo?

Clara Allende
Thanks for all your answers guys! This is very interesting :)

@Guille yes, I know and I already told you yesterday that I will study for tomorrow's exam and then play with crazy math stuff in Pharo :P

@Serge I took a look at your work (and Daniel's), it is awesome! I will get deeper into it next week, promise :)

On 2 August 2012 09:10, Frank Shearar <[hidden email]> wrote:
It's not hit the top of my todo list, but it is ON the list. (And it's
on the todo list primarily to try NumPy/SciPy, because those are
libraries most interesting to me.)

frank

On 2 August 2012 11:14, Serge Stinckwich <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Did you try to use this bridge ?
>
> Envoyé de mon iPhone
>
> Le 2 août 2012 à 16:55, Frank Shearar <[hidden email]> a écrit :
>
>> There's also NumPy and SciPy, which you can talk to via OpenQwaq's
>> (GPL'd) Python-Smalltalk bridge.
>>
>> frank
>>
>> On 2 August 2012 10:16, [hidden email] <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>> Maxima is pretty cool indeed. For inspiration, wxMaxima is a UI built on
>>> top. That's what we use over here for maths stuff with my wife.
>>> There is also Octave for numerical computing, Maxima being on the symbolic
>>> side.
>>>
>>>
>>> 2012/8/2 Lawson English <[hidden email]>
>>>>
>>>> Recently, I ran into this: http://maxima.sourceforge.net/
>>>>
>>>> an interface/binding lib might be easier than writing your own from
>>>> scratch.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> L
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On 8/1/12 3:03 PM, Clara Allende wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>> Hi guys, after having exhausting four months of Physics lessons, I
>>>>> decided that would be fun to write a program to deal with Electricity
>>>>> problems :) (Yeah, I'm not a normal person :P)
>>>>>
>>>>> So, I need to make differential and integral calculus, are there any
>>>>> libraries to do so? Or any place that I can take a look at?
>>>>>
>>>>> Thanks in advance!
>>>>>
>>>>> Cheers
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> Squeak from the very start (introduction to Squeak and Pharo Smalltalk for
>>>> the (almost) complete and compleate beginner).
>>>> https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6601A198DF14788D&feature=view_all
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>
>


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Re: Differential and Integral calculus in Pharo?

Nicolas Cellier
There is also StMath in Visualworks
Or maybe you could try to exhumate MathMorphs?

Differentiation is easy, and you can have fun implementing your own...
Integral calculus though is a tougher subject.

Nicolas

2012/8/2 Clara Allende <[hidden email]>:

> Thanks for all your answers guys! This is very interesting :)
>
> @Guille yes, I know and I already told you yesterday that I will study for
> tomorrow's exam and then play with crazy math stuff in Pharo :P
>
> @Serge I took a look at your work (and Daniel's), it is awesome! I will get
> deeper into it next week, promise :)
>
>
> On 2 August 2012 09:10, Frank Shearar <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>> It's not hit the top of my todo list, but it is ON the list. (And it's
>> on the todo list primarily to try NumPy/SciPy, because those are
>> libraries most interesting to me.)
>>
>> frank
>>
>> On 2 August 2012 11:14, Serge Stinckwich <[hidden email]>
>> wrote:
>> > Did you try to use this bridge ?
>> >
>> > Envoyé de mon iPhone
>> >
>> > Le 2 août 2012 à 16:55, Frank Shearar <[hidden email]> a écrit
>> > :
>> >
>> >> There's also NumPy and SciPy, which you can talk to via OpenQwaq's
>> >> (GPL'd) Python-Smalltalk bridge.
>> >>
>> >> frank
>> >>
>> >> On 2 August 2012 10:16, [hidden email] <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> >>> Maxima is pretty cool indeed. For inspiration, wxMaxima is a UI built
>> >>> on
>> >>> top. That's what we use over here for maths stuff with my wife.
>> >>> There is also Octave for numerical computing, Maxima being on the
>> >>> symbolic
>> >>> side.
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>> 2012/8/2 Lawson English <[hidden email]>
>> >>>>
>> >>>> Recently, I ran into this: http://maxima.sourceforge.net/
>> >>>>
>> >>>> an interface/binding lib might be easier than writing your own from
>> >>>> scratch.
>> >>>>
>> >>>>
>> >>>> L
>> >>>>
>> >>>>
>> >>>>
>> >>>> On 8/1/12 3:03 PM, Clara Allende wrote:
>> >>>>>
>> >>>>> Hi guys, after having exhausting four months of Physics lessons, I
>> >>>>> decided that would be fun to write a program to deal with
>> >>>>> Electricity
>> >>>>> problems :) (Yeah, I'm not a normal person :P)
>> >>>>>
>> >>>>> So, I need to make differential and integral calculus, are there any
>> >>>>> libraries to do so? Or any place that I can take a look at?
>> >>>>>
>> >>>>> Thanks in advance!
>> >>>>>
>> >>>>> Cheers
>> >>>>
>> >>>>
>> >>>>
>> >>>> --
>> >>>> Squeak from the very start (introduction to Squeak and Pharo
>> >>>> Smalltalk for
>> >>>> the (almost) complete and compleate beginner).
>> >>>>
>> >>>> https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6601A198DF14788D&feature=view_all
>> >>>>
>> >>>>
>> >>>
>> >>
>> >
>>
>

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Re: Differential and Integral calculus in Pharo?

Stéphane Ducasse
In reply to this post by Clara Allende
did you check didier besset numerical methods book and code?

Stef
On Aug 2, 2012, at 12:03 AM, Clara Allende wrote:

> Hi guys, after having exhausting four months of Physics lessons, I decided that would be fun to write a program to deal with Electricity problems :) (Yeah, I'm not a normal person :P)
>
> So, I need to make differential and integral calculus, are there any libraries to do so? Or any place that I can take a look at?
>
> Thanks in advance!
>
> Cheers


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Re: Differential and Integral calculus in Pharo?

S Krish
In reply to this post by Clara Allende

Yes, I remember my love for Kirchoff's circuit laws years back..!!.. 

Electronics:

matrix version of Kirchhoff's current law is the basis of most circuit simulation software, such as SPICE / PSPICE. Interesting to have a interface to PSPICE as Tektronix had/ may still have in VW. Build it out of Pharo, we could have the challenge to Cadence..with their C++ ecquivalent..

Had an opportunity to see that VW stuff with its simulation of VLSI circuits running up 60000 elements.. and complex simulations.. real time. Cool stuff.. 


On Thu, Aug 2, 2012 at 3:33 AM, Clara Allende <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi guys, after having exhausting four months of Physics lessons, I decided that would be fun to write a program to deal with Electricity problems :) (Yeah, I'm not a normal person :P)

So, I need to make differential and integral calculus, are there any libraries to do so? Or any place that I can take a look at? 

Thanks in advance!

Cheers

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Re: Differential and Integral calculus in Pharo?

Dale Henrichs
Krish,

Haha, funny that you mention that ... I wrote that software, called ADS (for Analog IC Design System), while working at Tektronix. That was the project that I cut my Smalltalk teeth on:)

I started the project using the Tek 4404 in 1985.

When Tektronix got out of the Smalltalk business (another story) I ported ADS to ObjectWorks. I left Tektronix in 1992 to go to work for Digitalk.

The team at Tektronix kept working on ADS, porting it to the newer platforms over time ...

The last time I checked ADS was still being used ... that was around 2005, I think.

So it's had a long and productive lifetime.

Dale

----- Original Message -----
| From: "S Krish" <[hidden email]>
| To: [hidden email]
| Sent: Friday, August 3, 2012 5:55:28 AM
| Subject: Re: [Pharo-project] Differential and Integral calculus in Pharo?
|
|
|
| Yes, I remember my love for Kirchoff's circuit laws years back..!!..
|
|
| Electronics:
|
|
|
| A matrix version of Kirchhoff's current law is the basis of most
| circuit simulation software , such as SPICE / PSPICE. Interesting to
| have a interface to PSPICE as Tektronix had/ may still have in VW.
| Build it out of Pharo, we could have the challenge to Cadence..with
| their C++ ecquivalent..
|
|
| Had an opportunity to see that VW stuff with its simulation of VLSI
| circuits running up 60000 elements.. and complex simulations.. real
| time. Cool stuff..
|
|
|
| On Thu, Aug 2, 2012 at 3:33 AM, Clara Allende <
| [hidden email] > wrote:
|
|
| Hi guys, after having exhausting four months of Physics lessons, I
| decided that would be fun to write a program to deal with
| Electricity problems :) (Yeah, I'm not a normal person :P)
|
|
| So, I need to make differential and integral calculus, are there any
| libraries to do so? Or any place that I can take a look at?
|
|
| Thanks in advance!
|
|
| Cheers
|

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Re: Differential and Integral calculus in Pharo?

Clara Allende
In reply to this post by S Krish
:) Eventually I would like to get my hands on circuits in smalltalk, but so far I'm much more interested in Magnetism (Faraday-Lenz, Ampère... I would like to have those in my little program. We'll see)

On 3 August 2012 09:55, S Krish <[hidden email]> wrote:

Yes, I remember my love for Kirchoff's circuit laws years back..!!.. 

Electronics:

matrix version of Kirchhoff's current law is the basis of most circuit simulation software, such as SPICE / PSPICE. Interesting to have a interface to PSPICE as Tektronix had/ may still have in VW. Build it out of Pharo, we could have the challenge to Cadence..with their C++ ecquivalent..

Had an opportunity to see that VW stuff with its simulation of VLSI circuits running up 60000 elements.. and complex simulations.. real time. Cool stuff.. 


On Thu, Aug 2, 2012 at 3:33 AM, Clara Allende <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi guys, after having exhausting four months of Physics lessons, I decided that would be fun to write a program to deal with Electricity problems :) (Yeah, I'm not a normal person :P)

So, I need to make differential and integral calculus, are there any libraries to do so? Or any place that I can take a look at? 

Thanks in advance!

Cheers


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Re: Differential and Integral calculus in Pharo?

cdavidshaffer
In reply to this post by Clara Allende

On Aug 1, 2012, at 6:03 PM, Clara Allende wrote:

Hi guys, after having exhausting four months of Physics lessons, I decided that would be fun to write a program to deal with Electricity problems :) (Yeah, I'm not a normal person :P)

So, I need to make differential and integral calculus, are there any libraries to do so? Or any place that I can take a look at? 

Thanks in advance!

Cheers

In case you haven't already come across it:


In my personal experience the algorithms in the book are often naive and problematic compared to industrial-strength numerical algorithms but they are also quite often good enough for a first attempt at some numerical work.

David

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Re: Differential and Integral calculus in Pharo?

Schwab,Wilhelm K
short of symbolic manipulation (e.g. maple), all we do is discretize and approximate, right?

Integration (aka quadrature) is "easy" but numerical diff is very unstable.  ODEs solve well w/ Runge-Kutta methods.





From: [hidden email] [[hidden email]] on behalf of David Shaffer [[hidden email]]
Sent: Sunday, August 05, 2012 5:13 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [Pharo-project] Differential and Integral calculus in Pharo?


On Aug 1, 2012, at 6:03 PM, Clara Allende wrote:

Hi guys, after having exhausting four months of Physics lessons, I decided that would be fun to write a program to deal with Electricity problems :) (Yeah, I'm not a normal person :P)

So, I need to make differential and integral calculus, are there any libraries to do so? Or any place that I can take a look at? 

Thanks in advance!

Cheers

In case you haven't already come across it:


In my personal experience the algorithms in the book are often naive and problematic compared to industrial-strength numerical algorithms but they are also quite often good enough for a first attempt at some numerical work.

David

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Re: Differential and Integral calculus in Pharo?

cdavidshaffer
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On Aug 5, 2012, at 5:20 PM, Schwab,Wilhelm K wrote:

short of symbolic manipulation (e.g. maple), all we do is discretize and approximate, right?

Integration (aka quadrature) is "easy" but numerical diff is very unstable.  ODEs solve well w/ Runge-Kutta methods.



Definitely, for some simple problems.  Just to scratch the surface...Besset only provides two quadrature methods: Romberg and Simpson both of which are very problematic for many integrals (accumulation of underflow being one of the more common but I'm sure google can probably give you a longer list than I can).  If I remember correctly neither of his algorithms employ adaptive step sizes (although I think that they respond to "data sources" with varying step sizes properly) so be ready for arbitrarily large errors with rapidly varying integrands.  Most of the better libraries provide adaptive integrators and several variants of them because the world of "quadrature" is not one-size-fits all.  The book "Numerical Recipes" (Press et al) touches the only the tip of this iceberg but its a start for those that want to go beyond Besset's book.

As for diff-eqs: I don't think Besset includes Runge-Kutta or any other diff-eq integrators.  RK or Adam's Bashforth are simple enough to implement, though, but again said implementation will likely be problematic, especially for very stiff equations but even in simpler cases for systems of equations that have singularities (despite the name, singularities in systems of equations are very common).  More sophisticated solvers deal with these things well or one looks for specialized solvers for the problems at hand.

None of this touches on problems that will likely arise from the types of problems the original poster is trying to solve (they only specified E & M).  Maxwell's equations (time and space dependent PDE's) will require making  both time and space discrete, which in multiple dimensions can be prohibitive due to both memory and time constraints.  Normally one has to apply some knowledge of the physics to simplify the problem...or just start with a very simple problem ;-)  I'm assuming the original poster will start with some problems with high degrees of symmetry and move forward from there.  That is a great approach to learning numerical approaches to solving physics problems and simple tools will get them a long way.

David

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